Excavations yield keys to pre-Classic Maya history

Dr. Estrada-Belli’s dig continues to unveil important keys to Maya history. With MAI’s help, he is protecting sites at Holmul, where the pottery sherds below were found. Dr. Nina Nievins unearthed a massive Maya mask at Holmul, visited by Sarah Mott, Sam Haswell and Clay Haswell.  The miniature carved head was found at a new dig at Dos Aguadas, funded in part by National Geographic. At Cival, thought to be the oldest of all royal Maya cities , MAI helps fund guards protecting against looters.

exca1 exca2 exca3 exca4

Providing medical help

When MAI learned that the hospital in Melchor had run out of critical medicines, a matching grant was arranged by Board member Marco Gross, enabling the hospital to receive a truckload of antibiotics and other urgently needed medications they had lacked for six months.  The hospital serves a large Maya population throughout the region.

medical1 medical2 medical3 medical4

New dormitory at Holmul

A new outdoor dormitory is under construction at the archaeological site at Holmul. Dedicated to former Board member Roger “Chopper” Lyon, who died in a plane crash while carrying doctors to a free clinic in Mexico, will be an open-air “palapa” and will house international students.

The archaeology crew at Holmul leaves for a day of digging.

The archaeology crew at Holmul leaves for a day of digging.

International students gather at the Holmul site.

International students gather at the Holmul site.

Sam Haswell, Francisco-Estrada-Belli, and Clay Haswell at the dedication of the dorm for Chopper Lyon.

Sam Haswell, Francisco-Estrada-Belli, and Clay Haswell at the dedication of the dorm for Chopper Lyon.

Preserving antiquities

A grant from the Maya Archaeology Initiative purchased steel bars to prevent break-ins at a warehouse used by the Guatemalan government to protect priceless Mayan antiquities. The warehouse in Melchor de Mencos on the Guatemalan border with Belize has had repeated break-ins and vandalism.

bars3 bars2 bars1

Washington Post review: Heavenly Jade of the Maya

Shades of jade for the doomsday crowd
By Maura Judkis

The world probably isn’t going to end on Dec. 21, when the Mayan calendar does, and the rare Mayan artifacts in a new exhibition at the Inter-American Development Bank definitely aren’t cursed. But the team putting together the show, “Heavenly Jade of the Maya,” is putting forth a small offering of rum — a toast to the people who once revered these artifacts — just in case. Read more